In the News – Tissue Technology Award

In the News – Tissue Technology Award
by Nicholas M. Palumbo

Tissue paper can be a very hard grade of paper to make efficiently. Many chemicals go into a pulp slurry to increase certain properties of paper. These chemicals include; but are not limited to: dry strength, starch, anionic salicylic acid, alkyl ketene dimer, cationic poly acrylamide…etc. In order to reduce the amount of chemicals used to achieve the specifications of a certain grade, new methods have been sought out and awards have been given to bright minds that produce solutions towards solving this dilemma. An article titled ‘Valmet Presents its Tissue Technology Award to NCSU Grad Student Abdus Salam‘ exemplifies just this and is about Abdus Salam, a grad student from North Carolina State University. He won an award for his graduate study work pertaining to the pulp and paper industry, which also included a purse of twenty-five thousand dollars.

Abdus Salam, a graduate student from North Carolina State University (USA), receives Valmet's Tissue Technology Award from Jan Erikson, Vice President, Sales, Tissue Mills business unit Valmet, during the Tissue World Conference in Barcelona, Spain. image source: paperage.com

Abdus Salam, a graduate student from North Carolina State University (USA), receives Valmet’s Tissue Technology Award from Jan Erikson, Vice President, Sales, Tissue Mills business unit Valmet, during the Tissue World Conference in Barcelona, Spain. image source: paperage.com

The focus of the award this year was an environmentally friendly product. Sounds pretty much like ESF stuff, right? Salam developed a method to provide unique tissue characteristics using all natural materials (no hazardous chemicals and what-not). By crossing hardwood pulp with biodegradable extractives, Salam has accomplished outstanding absorbency properties in his paper. This process is sure to be implemented in industry due to the purity of the chemicals and the recognition Salam has received after awarded this great honor. Tissue mills are excited for this technique to become large-scale and I’m sure Abdus Salam is excited as well.


Nicholas M. Palumbo is majoring in paper engineering and will graduate in Spring 2016.

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